The largest and the most beautiful church in Berlin

Berliner Dom

History of the Berliner Dom

You can find the Berlin cathedral (Berliner Dom) on the Museum Island, in the heart of the city of Berlin. The cathedral is known as the Supreme Parish and Collegiate Church. It has never been a true cathedral, because it has never been the seat of a bishop. The Berliner Dom is in Baroque style with Italian Renaissance influences.

The current cathedral was constructed during 1894 – 1905 on the site of an old church from 15th century. In 1465 the Hohenzollern family needed a court church close to their new royal palace. For that purpose they used the catholic St. Erasmus chapel, located on the site of the Berlin cathedral on that time. It was elevated to the status of Collegiate Church. In Germany, they called such collegiate churches Domkirche. This is how the Berliner Dom got its name. The Hohenzollern family also used the church as a burial place. In 1539 the Dom became a Lutheran church and later in 1613 its status was changed again to Court and Parish Church. In the period from 1747 to 1750, under the rule of Frederick the Great, Johann Boumann the Elder built a new church in Baroque style on the place. Later between 1816 and 1822 Karl Friedrich Schinkel renovated the cathedral. In 1842 a new construction based on the plans of August Stüler began. Unfortunately the work stopped in 1848 without any essential progress.

In 1893 king Willem II ordered the demolition of the old building. The construction of the current cathedral, designed by Julius Carl Raschdorff, started. It took 11 years for the Berliner Dom to be completed and the consecration ceremony was in 1905. The church was heavily damaged by an air raid during the World War II. After long years of restoration and reconstruction, it reopened in 1993.

The organ

The church organ was built by Wilhelm Sauer in 1905. With its 7269 pipes and 113 registers it was the largest in Germany for that time.

The Hohenzollern Crypt

The crypt contains 94 coffins from the 16th century to the beginning of the 20th century.

The dome

You can climb the 270 steps to the viewing platform of the 114m-high dome. The platform surrounds the dome and gives a stunning 360 degree panorama over Berlin. You can see the Museum Island, Gendarmenmarkt, the Reichstag and the Rotes Rathaus. During the climbing you will pass along the cathedral’s museum. It presents drawings, photos and models of the history of the church.

Tips for visiting Berliner Dom

Leave the visiting of the crypt for last, because once you exit the crypt you can’t go back to the church.
More information about concerts held in the cathedral you can find here.

Useful information
Address: Am Lustgarten, 10178 Berlin
Access:
U-Bahn: lines U2, U5, U8 – station Alexanderplatz
S-Bahn: lines S5, S7, S9, S75 – station Hackescher Markt
Opening hours:
From Monday to Saturday: 09:00 AM – 08:00 PM
Sundays: 12:00 PM – 08:00 PM
From October to March the cathedral closes at 07:00 PM
Admission: 7 €
Web site: http://www.berlinerdom.de/

The cathedral from outside
The cathedral from outside
Berlin cathedral
Berlin cathedral
The altar, designed by Friedrich August Stüler
The altar, designed by Friedrich August Stüler
The church organ
The church organ
The apostle wall, designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel
The apostle wall, designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel
The dome
The dome
Staircase to the dome
Staircase to the dome
View from the dome
View from the dome
View from the dome
View from the dome
View from the dome
View from the dome
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Hohenzollern crypt
Stained glass window in the crypt
Stained glass window in the crypt

Have you visited the cathedral? Please leave your comment below.

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